News – 25-8 – Video calling in residential care centres made easy

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Video calling in residential care centres made easy

Although for the elderly who live in the over 1000 residential care centres in Belgium video calling would be an ideal way to break through their social isolation ...

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Tom Messiaen, managing partner of 25-8: “What we do is install a camera on the care centre resident´s television screen and connect it to a mini-node - a small device that we developed especially for this purpose. We connect this device in turn via HDMI cable to the television screen and via WiFi to the internet. Family and friends then have to download an app from the App Store or Google Play. From the app you can then call your mother or father (for example) in the residential care centre. They’ll see the incoming call displayed on the television screen or via a luminous signal on an armband they wear. When the call is answered by the resident, the caller appears on the television screen, and the video call can begin.”

 

Residential care centres don´t have to worry that their residents will be called by total strangers or will hold video calls with their family in the middle of the night.

Messiaen: “The residential care centres maintain control at all times. They determine who can call which resident and when. That takes place via an activation code which is given to the family member. In addition, they can also define at which hours video calls can be held. Does the residential care centre not want any nocturnal calls from family members? All of these parameters can be easily set via a dashboard.”

Care telephone as a first step

This summer we already took a first step in this direction of simplification. We stripped a care telephone of all its software, then installed a single program on it: WhatsApp. We created a total of 350 care telephones and provided them free of charge to all of the residential care centres we work with.

 

Messiaen: “At the time we saw this as a temporary solution, in order to give each retirement home resident during the lockdown a chance to stay in contact visually with family and friends. We received only positive signals from residential care centres and residents about this initiative. The link to a television screen and extra loud volume while video calling appeared to be a particular added value for the residents.”

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Video calling as a basic right

This encouraged us this summer to further develop the product structurally and sustainably together with the colleagues from Unmatched. The new product has been given the name LynX® hello and is being tested in a first residential care centre in September. Other interested residential care centres will then follow starting in October.

 

"We don´t know exactly what impact corona will have on the residential care centres in the longer term. But what we definitely do know is that video calling will quickly grow to become a basic right for every resident in a residential care centre. Actually it should already long since have been a basic right, but all this time while developing video apps one forgot to take user-friendliness for the elderly into account. With LynX® hello we are responding to the fact that most of the 70,000 care centre residents are not digitally savvy enough to deal with e.g. WhatsApp. Video calling can now finally become a basic right for the elderly without patient care assistants having to help them," Tom Messiaen concludes.

 

Would you like to make greater use of video calling?

More information about LynX® hello at www.lynxhello.eu.

 

Have any questions?

Contact your account manager, send an e-mail to info@25-8.eu or call +32 (0)50 28 98 10

Although for the elderly who live in the over 1000 residential care centres in Belgium video calling would be an ideal way to break through their social isolation ...

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Video calling in residential care centres made easy

Although for the elderly who live in the over 1000 residential care centres in Belgium video calling would be an ideal way to break through their social isolation ...

Tom Messiaen, managing partner of 25-8: “What we do is install a camera on the care centre resident´s television screen and connect it to a mini-node - a small device that we developed especially for this purpose. We connect this device in turn via HDMI cable to the television screen and via WiFi to the internet. Family and friends then have to download an app from the App Store or Google Play. From the app you can then call your mother or father (for example) in the residential care centre. They’ll see the incoming call displayed on the television screen or via a luminous signal on an armband they wear. When the call is answered by the resident, the caller appears on the television screen, and the video call can begin.”

 

Residential care centres don´t have to worry that their residents will be called by total strangers or will hold video calls with their family in the middle of the night.

PRODUCT_SHOT.jpg

Messiaen: “The residential care centres maintain control at all times. They determine who can call which resident and when. That takes place via an activation code which is given to the family member. In addition, they can also define at which hours video calls can be held. Does the residential care centre not want any nocturnal calls from family members? All of these parameters can be easily set via a dashboard.”

Care telephone as a first step

This summer we already took a first step in this direction of simplification. We stripped a care telephone of all its software, then installed a single program on it: WhatsApp. We created a total of 350 care telephones and provided them free of charge to all of the residential care centres we work with.

 

Messiaen: “At the time we saw this as a temporary solution, in order to give each retirement home resident during the lockdown a chance to stay in contact visually with family and friends. We received only positive signals from residential care centres and residents about this initiative. The link to a television screen and extra loud volume while video calling appeared to be a particular added value for the residents.”

VIDEOBELLEN_BEELD3.jpg

Video calling as a basic right

This encouraged us this summer to further develop the product structurally and sustainably together with the colleagues from Unmatched. The new product has been given the name LynX® hello and is being tested in a first residential care centre in September. Other interested residential care centres will then follow starting in October.

 

"We don´t know exactly what impact corona will have on the residential care centres in the longer term. But what we definitely do know is that video calling will quickly grow to become a basic right for every resident in a residential care centre. Actually it should already long since have been a basic right, but all this time while developing video apps one forgot to take user-friendliness for the elderly into account. With LynX® hello we are responding to the fact that most of the 70,000 care centre residents are not digitally savvy enough to deal with e.g. WhatsApp. Video calling can now finally become a basic right for the elderly without patient care assistants having to help them," Tom Messiaen concludes.

 

Would you like to make greater use of video calling?

More information about LynX® hello at www.lynxhello.eu.

 

Have any questions?

Contact your account manager, send an e-mail to info@25-8.eu or call +32 (0)50 28 98 10

Although for the elderly who live in the over 1000 residential care centres in Belgium video calling would be an ideal way to break through their social isolation ...

Share this message:

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